Serenity

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Serenity
Serenity. My vision on this image was to tell a story about the Appaloosa and the Nez Pierce. I chose the best of our jewelry including the Warrior cuff, Squash blossom necklaces and a beautiful rendition of a Nez Pierce wedding dress made for us by Myka. Photography with a Purpose started as a story and fund raiser project. Our mission is to donate the profits to the Navajo models and nation, while providing our clients a beautiful piece of Brit West photography. I love photography and see this as an outlet to help others. Our prints are offered in Fine Art Hot press Cotton Paper or incredible metallic gloss in a sophisticated 10 color ink systems for the ultimate in fine art reproductions. Our giclee offered on the finest Epsom smooth matt cotton paper, or incredible Epson Metallic Gloss paper. The Nez Perce or Nimiipu people originally referred to their type of horse as the Ma’amin. A selectively bred horse, noted and sought after by explorers, traders, and surrounding tribes, the Nez Perce horse flourished on the rich grasslands of the Palouse and numbered in the tens of thousands before disruption, war, and flight brought them to the world’s attention. No equine feat of courage and endurance is more famous or more spectacular than the 1877 flight of the Nez Perce. In that year, the United States Government demanded that the Wallowa band of Nez Perce leave their homeland forever and take up residence on a continually diminishing reservation. The band complied, but a wave of violence on both sides resulted, and, faced with the threat of an all-out war, a number of Nez Perce chose flight. Between July and November of 1877, about 750 Nez Perce men, women, and children with over two thousand horses outran—sometimes by weeks—a similar force of U.S. Cavalry. When the Nez Perce were finally intercepted a few miles from the Canadian border, most surrendered. Their remaining horses, (many of them starving and exhausted), were exterminated. Others were dispersed. Despite—or perhaps because of—the national fame these horses had won during this well-publicized feat of endurance, no move was made to preserve the breed’s integrity. Out crossed through generations to ranch and draft horses, they were almost forgotten until 1938, when the efforts of Claude Thompson saved what he calculated to be a remaining few hundred horses from extinction. The Appaloosa Horse Registry began. (DreamHorseFarms.com)
Serenity. My vision on this image was to tell a story about the Appaloosa and the Nez Pierce. I chose the best of our jewelry including the Warrior cuff, Squash blossom necklaces and a beautiful rendition of a Nez Pierce wedding dress made for us by Myka. Photography with a Purpose started as a story and fund raiser project. Our mission is to donate the profits to the Navajo models and nation, while providing our clients a beautiful piece of Brit West photography. I love photography and see this as an outlet to help others. Our prints are offered in Fine Art Hot press Cotton Paper or incredible metallic gloss in a sophisticated 10 color ink systems for the ultimate in fine art reproductions. Our giclee offered on the finest Epsom smooth matt cotton paper, or incredible Epson Metallic Gloss paper. The Nez Perce or Nimiipu people originally referred to their type of horse as the Ma’amin. A selectively bred horse, noted and sought after by explorers, traders, and surrounding tribes, the Nez Perce horse flourished on the rich grasslands of the Palouse and numbered in the tens of thousands before disruption, war, and flight brought them to the world’s attention. No equine feat of courage and endurance is more famous or more spectacular than the 1877 flight of the Nez Perce. In that year, the United States Government demanded that the Wallowa band of Nez Perce leave their homeland forever and take up residence on a continually diminishing reservation. The band complied, but a wave of violence on both sides resulted, and, faced with the threat of an all-out war, a number of Nez Perce chose flight. Between July and November of 1877, about 750 Nez Perce men, women, and children with over two thousand horses outran—sometimes by weeks—a similar force of U.S. Cavalry. When the Nez Perce were finally intercepted a few miles from the Canadian border, most surrendered. Their remaining horses, (many of them starving and exhausted), were exterminated. Others were dispersed. Despite—or perhaps because of—the national fame these horses had won during this well-publicized feat of endurance, no move was made to preserve the breed’s integrity. Out crossed through generations to ranch and draft horses, they were almost forgotten until 1938, when the efforts of Claude Thompson saved what he calculated to be a remaining few hundred horses from extinction. The Appaloosa Horse Registry began. (DreamHorseFarms.com)
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